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Ensure Security of Drone (RPAS) Operations in Europe

/25th August 2016, DRONE MARKET WATCHTM/ Drones (RPAS) are not immune to potential unlawful actions. Potentially, RPAS could be used as weapons, the navigation or communication system signals of other RPAS could be jammed or ground control stations hijacked. The information needed to manage 4D trajectories in the future air traffic management system and to remotely control and aircraft will need to be communicated and shared in real time by different aviation operators to optimize the performance of the system.
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How to Fly Drone in Switzerland

/27th July 2016, DRONE MARKET WATCHTM/ Main stakeholder responsible for drone (UAV) flight regulation in Switzerland is Federal Office of Civil Aviation (FOCA). Main document affecting drone (UAV) flight regulations in Switzerland is DETEC Ordinance on Special Category Aircraft (OSCA). With effect from 1 August 2014, for safety reasons drones may no longer be operated above gatherings of people (several dozen people standing in close proximity to one another) or within a radius of 100 meters from gatherings of people.
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FAA Published Small Unmanned Aircraft Regulations (Part 107) - USA

/21st June 2016, DRONE MARKET WATCHTM/ The new rules for non-hobbyist small unmanned aircraft (UAS) operations – Part 107 of the Federal Aviation Regulations (PDF) – cover a broad spectrum of commercial uses for drones weighing less than 55 pounds. Here are the highlights of the new rule. The small UAS operator manipulating the controls of a drone should always avoid manned aircraft and never operate in a careless or reckless manner. You must keep your drone within sight. Alternatively, if you use First Person View or similar technology, you must have a visual observer always keep your aircraft within unaided sight (for example, no binoculars). However, even if you use a visual observer, you must still keep your unmanned aircraft close enough to be able to see it if something unexpected happens.
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Opening the European Union (EU) Aviation Market to the Civil and Commercial Use of Drones (RPAS)

/9th May 2016, DRONE MARKET WATCHTM/ Civil aviation contributes to an integrated logistical transport chain that aims to better serve citizens and society. It adds value through offering fast, reliable and resilient connections in a global network. By 2050, a number of different aircraft categories are expected to be operating, diverse in size, performance and type, with some still having a pilot on board, but many remotely piloted or fully automated. Opening the European market for remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) – or the civilian and commercial use of drones - is therefore an important step towards the aviation market of the future.
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Drone (UAV) Flight Regulations in Sweden

/11th April 2016, DRONE MARKET WATCHTM/ Main stakeholder responsible for drone (UAV) flight regulation in Sweden is Civil Aviation Department at the Swedish Transport Agency. This agency is responsible for design, manufacture, modification, maintenance and activities with civil UAS within Sweden. Main document affecting drone (UAV) flight regulations in Sweden is „The Swedish Transport Agency´s regulations on unmanned aircraft systems (UAS)“. According to these regulations drones (UAVs) in Sweden are classified into three categories, as the first category has two sub-categories.
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Fundamental Rights Protection of EU Citizens in Drone (RPAS) Flight Operations

/18th February 2016, DRONE MARKET WATCHTM/ Drone (RPAS) operations must not lead to fundamental rights being infringed, including the respect for the right to private and family life, and the protection of personal data. Amongst the wide range of potential civil RPAS applications a number may involve collection of personal data and raise ethical, privacy or data protection concerns, in particular in the area of surveillance, monitoring, mapping or video recording. RPAS operators would need to comply with the applicable data protection provisions, notably those set out in the national measures established pursuant to the Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC 21 and the Framework Decision 2008/977 22.
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Drone Operation Permits in Canada

/5th October 2015, DRONE MARKET WATCHTM/ The Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs) require unmanned air vehicle (UAV) operators to apply for SFOCs, so Transport Canada can ensure operators use their UAV reliably and safely. This applies to all UAVs used for anything but the fun of flying and regardless of how much they weigh. Transport Canada inspectors will review their SFOC application and determine what safety conditions are needed to reduce the risks. Drone (UAV) operators must send a detailed application to the Transport Canada Civil Aviation office  in the region where you intend to fly your UAV. Application must include contact information and describe how, when and where drone (UAV) operators plan to use their UAV, as well as how they plan to deal with the safety risks.
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Overview of FAA Small UAS Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in USA – Part 107

/19th May 2015, DRONE MARKET WATCHTM/ The Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration proposed a framework of regulations (PDF) that would allow routine use of certain small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) in today’s aviation system, while maintaining flexibility to accommodate future technological innovations. The FAA proposal offers safety rules for small UAS (under 55 pounds) conducting non-recreational operations. The rule would limit flights to daylight and visual-line-of-sight operations. It also addresses height restrictions, operator certification, optional use of a visual observer, aircraft registration and marking, and operational limits.
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